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A Living Will is a written statement that expresses your wishes about medical treatment that would delay death from a
terminal condition. It also applies to situations of persistent vegetative state or irreversible coma. A Living Will would
speak for you in the event that you were unable to communicate. It gives direction and guidance to others, but is not as
broadly applicable as a Durable Health Care Power of Attorney. For example, a Living Will does not permit health care
providers to stop tube feeding - only an agent appointed by a Durable Health Care Power of Attorney or a court-appointed
guardian may make such a decision.


A Parental Power of Attorney is sometimes called a form for Delegation of Parental Powers. A person (usually a parent or
guardian) signs a Parental Power of Attorney in front of a notary to give a trusted and willing person (Attorney-in-Fact or
Agent) power to act in place of the parent or guardian. The parent or guardian in this case is called the Principal. A
Parental Power of Attorney must be notarized. A Parental Power of Attorney is NOT a court order.


A person (Principal) signs a Special Power of Attorney in front of a notary to give a trusted and willing person (Attorney-in-
Fact or Agent) power to act in place of the Principal. A Special Power of Attorney identifies a beginning date and an
ending date or may be revoked. A Durable Special Power of Attorney continues if you, as Principal are incapacitated or
become incompetent, and ends when you die, unless the Principal revokes it. A Special Power of Attorney must be
notarized. A Special Power of Attorney is NOT a court order.


“To revoke” means to recall or cancel a power or authority previously granted. You may revoke a Power of Attorney
at any time and for whatever reason you wish. You must do it in writing and give a copy of the Revocation form to any
interested third party such as a bank or financial institution with whom you or your Agent have business. If your Power
of Attorney was recorded for real estate purposes, the revocation must be recorded as well.


A person (Principal) signs a Power of Attorney in front of a notary to give a trusted and willing person (Attorney-in-
Fact or Agent) authority to act in place of the Principal. A Regular Power of Attorney has a beginning (effective) date, and
ends either on the end date or when the Principal revokes it. A Durable Power of Attorney has no specified end date and
ends on the death of the Principal, or upon revocation by the Principal. Also, with a Durable Power of Attorney, if the
Principal becomes disabled or incapacitated, the Attorney-in-Fact may continue acting as such despite the disability,
incapacity or the expiration date.


We are not attorneys and therefore, by law, we cannot explain or interpret the contents of any document for you, instruct you on how to complete a document or direct you on the advisability of signing a particular document. By doing so we would be engaging in the unauthorized practice of law, and could face legal penalties that include the possibility of incarceration. Any important questions about your document should be addressed by an attorney.


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